A guide for school-based mentors

THE DELICATE BALANCE OF MENTORING SOMEONE IS NOT CREATING THEM IN YOUR OWN IMAGE, BUT GIVING THEM THE OPPORTUNITY TO CREATE THEMSELVES. – STEVEN SPIELBERG

 

Introduction

The terms mentoring, modelling, and coaching are frequently used interchangeably by educators. While there are overlaps in meaning among these terms, there are significant differences in concept. Modelling is the process of serving as a model. One of the functions of a mentor is to be a positive role model. In the context of teaching, coaching, frequently referred to as peer coaching, is the assistance that one teacher provides to another in the development of teaching skills, strategies, or techniques generally within a formal three-part structure: preparation, lesson observation, and reflecting/ debriefing. In doing classroom observation in mentoring, the coaching structure is commonly used to structure the classroom observation by the mentor. Coaching by the mentor may also become an essential activity if this type of support is needed by the beginning teacher. Mentoring is the process of serving as a mentor, someone who facilitates and assists another’s development.

The process includes modeling because the mentor must be able to model the messages and suggestions being taught to the beginning teacher. Also, as indicated, the mentor must be able to serve as a model of the teacher’s role in education. The mentoring process includes coaching as an instructional technique used in apprenticeship at the workplace. In addition, it includes ‚Äúcognitive coaching,‚Äù a term gaining wider familiarity in education. To be effective, the mentor must be able to demonstrate a range of cognitive coaching competencies, such as posing carefully constructed questions to stimulate reflection, paraphrasing, probing, using wait-time, and collecting and using data to improve teaching and learning. Mentoring, like coaching, is a collaborative process.

This quick-reference guide addresses core aspects that mentor teachers should have in their mentoring toolbox! Each section begins with framing questions. The purpose of the framing questions is to review what is already known about the topic while receiving an introduction to new ideas.

Please click on ‘Theme 1: Mentoring Expectations’ below to continue.

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Course Includes

  • 9 Lessons
  • 1 Quiz
  • Course Certificate